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Was it really worth the effort?

The Met is rather pleased with its use of the Proceeds of Crime Act to target a Wandsworth dealer, taking his stash, his cash and sundry other items. I have misgivings about the powers enabling confiscation of property unless the targeted person can prove the property was not paid for out of funds raised by nefarious activities, and have vented - at length - about it before.

In that case, the Her Majesty's Finest got their mitts on well over half a million pounds worth of goods. This time it is a matter of maybe £2500, and while I will agree that a plasma TV, a brace of bikes and games consoles have clear resale values, they went that little bit further and decided to grab his collection of baseball caps and trainers. At this stage I will, narrowly, resist the temptation to make a facetious comment about impairing someone's ability to make a living by confiscating the tools of his trade. A quick examination of ebay listings for used baseball caps shows that they do not go for a great deal of money - a few quid, mainly. Trainers might be a different kettle of fish, but if used, I doubt it. Always supposing the Met entrusts listing of the items to an ebay wiz, and maximises the profit on selling the items, will that be a good use of police time and money? The whole business smacks rather more of spite than justice, frankly.

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Blogger Letters From A Tory said... 8:40 am

Yet another attempt by Labour to prove that they are 'tough on crime' falls apart at the seams.  



Blogger Blue Eyes said... 9:02 am

I don't mind their "proceeds" being seized after conviction, I'm less impressed with NL's new plan which seems to be "if you are arrested you must have done something naughty so we'll seize your assets just in case".

But in this case I agree, seizing a laod of worthless chav junk probably wasn't a very efficient use of resources.  



Anonymous JuliaM said... 9:23 am

"The whole business smacks rather more of spite than justice, frankly."

Yes. Yes it does, doesn't it?

Still, Labour have proved they can't deliver justice. Spite, though..? Well, that they can do...  



Blogger Unsworth said... 9:52 am

So the cops go around nicking people's personal property?

What else is new?  



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