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Are you now, or have you ever been 'a Brit'?

I do not particularly like being called 'a Brit', although there are worse things we get called. It is, at best, an informal word, and I would think that 'Briton' should be preferred, especially in a document that carries the imprimatur of the European Union.

Just to show that I am not making this up, the document can be downloaded here.

Here are the offending sentences, in a PowerPoint presentation on Intecultural Dialogue (which is far too dull for the usual treatment):

"Thirteen percent of Brits said there lives were not being enriched at all by inter-cultural contact (the highest EU figure apart from Cyprus)".

"The Brits were in line with the average EU citizen in saying that young people did benefit (very much) from intercultural dialogue (37% vs. 34% EU average)".

Later on it manages to be a little more formal: "With 28% of British citizens showing no interest at all, this proved to be the most sceptic group of citizens in the EU. However, just over half (51%) did show an interest, with the better educated and those still in the British educational system being the most numerous".

Elsewhere the author manages to refer to Poles rather than Polaks, French rather than Gauls, Portuguese rather than Portos and Lithunians rather than Litvaks.

C/O of the handy properties feature of PowerPoint, it would appear that the writer is one Robert Lukacs, and his manager Gergely Hideg, both of Gallup Europe.

The names would suggest that they are Magyars Hungarian, although a little light googling would suggest that there is certainly one Lukacs at Gallup in Romania, and he appears to be one of a number of people who have irked the organ of the Greater Romania Party (remember them?), it having published his e-mail address along with a number of others, because of the following:

"Ziarul "Tricolorul" publică, în premieră, un document senzaţional: lista numelor şi a adreselor de e-mail ale membrilor "grupului antiromânesc de reacţie rapidă" Ne-am obişnuit ca, periodic, să citim în presă ori să auzim la talk-show-uri despre "protestele unor intelectuali de elită" ("fruntaşi ai societăţii civile", "directori de opinie") împotriva aşa-zişilor "antisemiţi", "extremişti", "xenofobi", "homofobi", "anti-europeni" din lumea românească".

Romanian is yet another language I have no facility with, but the gist of the extract above is pretty clear.

Always supposing it is the same individual, perhaps he is intent on collecting the entire set of EU countries, so to speak.

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