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The return of Mangosuthu Buthelezi

Well, I suppose he never really went away, but it is the first time I have read about him in a long time, and what a lot of sense the leader of Inkatha (and, as every schoolboy knows, star of 'Zulu') speaks:

"The next object of liberation in South Africa must be the national economy, Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi said on Tuesday. "Our people have been given political rights, but they still lack the freedom to participate fully in the market economy". The labour market remained constrained by racially defined regulations resulting in skills shortages. Financial markets still bore the brunt of sanctions-busting strategies....For his part, Buthelezi said the argument had always been "more about wealth creation than wealth redistribution". The IFP had consistently advocated a free enterprise economy in which the fruits of growth were shared on merit". Source.

Alas Buthelezi is unlikely to be implementing a freeing up of the South African economy any time soon, as the IFP has seen its share of the vote fall in successive elections - to just 7% in 2004 - and is only the third party in SA after the ANC and the Democratic Alliance. Still, it is encouraging that a man in his late 70s is still fighting the good fight.

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Anonymous nomad said... 7:41 am

To be realistic, Mango B's support is drawn from a very small area of the country and while the Marxist throwbacks to the 1960s remain in power, little change can be expected. Pity really as RSA has the potential to be one of the richest countries not only in Africa but also in the world.  



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